Xpress_BestOf_2017_Vote_Facebook_CoverPhoto.png

Metro Wines Blogs

Metro Wines Asheville, NC

Asheville Brew Blog

Blind Tasting League

Lou Collichio came to Metro Wines with twenty eight years of experience in the spirits industry. He started his career in New Jersey first managing a small wine shop and then working for a chain of discount beer, wine, and liquor stores as a beer buyer and assistant store manager. After moving to Asheville in 2006, Lou worked for both Greenlife Grocery, and Whole Foods as a beer and wine buyer. His passion for all things craft beer started at the dawn of the American craft beer movement and has continued unabated to this day.

Lou says he is a "recovering musician." We haven't heard his music yet but what we do know is that Lou has stories! He plans to share some of his greatest hits with us and you on "Brewing UP a Storm" our beer blog. did you know that Lou was in a 7th grade play with James Gandolfini and lou stole the show? Stay tuned!


Anita Riley is the cellarman at Mystery Brewing in Hillsborough, NC and continues to blog for "Brewing Up a Storm." She holds the title of Certified Beer Server through Cicerone, USA, and is a native of WNC.

follow-anita

Friday Beer Tasting - "Gateway" Beers

This past week, my parents have been visiting me in Asheville. As we traipsed around town, stopping here and there for a bite to eat or a refreshment, my Dad continued to ask me for a beer he could drink. I won't mention what he has been drinking, but it's from a brewery that rhymes with "dud" and has an abv of 2.4%. My mom? Well, she likes a glass of wine, but has gladly joined the quest for the perfect beer.

This got me thinking...we have a wide variety of beer on our shelves of varying styles and I truly believe there is something for everyone. That leads to the big question what beers make a good "gateway" to world of craft beers?

Join us at Metro Wines this upcoming Friday, June 17 to taste my recommendations! 5-7pm at 169 Charlotte Street in North Asheville. Don't like craft beer? Perfect!

Wicked Weed Lunatic Blonde 

Brewed with Belgian hops and yeast, this Blonde Ale imparts the fruity, bread flavors of a classic Belgian Blonde. It is simplicity at its finest and pleasant introduction into the subtle, pleasant flavors attained through care, detail, and quality ingredients invested by craft breweries.  The packaging tells the story best..."Some believe it moonstruck madness to craft Old World ales for modern palettes constantly clamoring for the extremes of 'Hoppy' or 'Sour.' While our love for those extremities is strong, we believe that subtley, balance, and simplicity in beer are sacred necessities."

 

Hi Wire Uprisin Hefeweizen

Hi Wire describes Uprisin as, "...a traditional hefeweizen with just the right balance of banana, clove, and peppercorn spice. Brewed with North Carolina grown wheat from Asheville's Riverbend Malt House, this hazy straw colored beer is perfect for any lazy summer day. 

Hefeweizens are German style of beer literally meaning yeast (hefe) and wheat (weisse). Hi Wire stays fairly true to the German tradition. Uprisin Hefeweizen is a low-bitterness beer, with a clean, refreshing finish. Who doesn't like a good thirst-quencher?

 

Highland Gaelic

Often referred to as the water of Asheville (purely complimentary). Highland Gaelic is a "A deep amber-colored American ale, featuring a rich malty body. Cascade and Willamette hops add a complex hop flavor and aroma. This ale is exceptionally balanced between malty sweetness and delicate hop bitterness."

We're venturing a little further down the flavor spectrum with the malts and even a little further with the hops. The key is that the two of these ingredients provide "balance." Neither is too intimidating for the craft beer drinker in-training, but both contribute a great deal of flavor. Notes of caramel blend with a soft bitterness at the back of your palate. Highland Gaelic gives all a warm Scottish welcome to the world of craft beer!

 

New Belgium Hof Ten Dormaal Golden Ale

Beyond recognition...Beer drinkers take their first sip of a beer with some level of expectation. An expectation that the beverage they are about to taste will have some similarities to what they identify as beer, whether it be the broad category or a specific style. What if (brace yourselves) the beer they tasted was unlike anything they had ever tasted before? What happens to those preconceived notions? My theory is that if they take a swig of the New Belgian-Hof Ten Dormal collaboration all preconceived notions will fly face first out the door. Drinking this golden ale is a new experience and introducing such a complex beverage to a novice craft beer drinker is adventurous. In the case of my mother, the key to her heart was a Belgian. 

"Like New Belgium, Hof Ten Dormaal blurs the line between tradition and innovation: The charming family-owned farm and brewery produces everything from classic Belgian blonds to sours fermented by ambient flora to forward-thinking hoppy saisons. In that spirit, we’ve joined forces to craft a deliciously uncommon springtime golden ale, which blends Old World ingredients with modern flavors. Spelt, malted sunflower seeds, and wild carrot herbs swell for a nutty, bready, grassy wash, while Saaz and Mosaic hops lend spicy, tropical accents to the sip. Kick off your winter boots and welcome in the fresh flavors of spring."

Continue reading
663 Hits

Friday Night Beer Tasting - "GOH-zuh"

Gose (pronounced GOH-zuh) is a German style of beer that imparts a thirst-quenching lemon, often herbaceous, salinity through it's addition of coriander, salt, and lactic bacteria for fermentation.

As the temperatures rise this weekend, Gose would make a great sidekick to any outdoor activity. Join us tonight, June 10, at Metro Wines from 5-7pm to taste two of our favorites: Asheville's newest Hi-Wire Gose and Westbrook Gose out of Mount Pleasant, SC.

 

HI-WIRE GOSE 

Hi-Wire describes their Gose (4.2%), brewed with Pink Himalayan Salt, as tart, supremely drinkable, and incredibly balanced with complex fruit character. Crisp citrus and lemon-lime from coriander marries with their house Lactobacillus strain, creating subtle notes of stone fruit and apricot in this hazy, sessionable sour wheat beer.

 

WESTBROOK GOSE

According to Westbrook, this is their interpretation of Gose, a traditional German-style sour wheat beer brewed with coriander and salt. Sour, salty, delicious. Once nearly extinct, this very refreshing style is making a comeback.

Continue reading
601 Hits

Beer Blind Tasting League is BACK! June 15th!

Join us for the return of the "Beer" Blind Tasting League taking place next Wednesday, June 15, and every third Wednesday of the month following from 6:00-7:00pm. 
 
Similar in format to the Wine Blind Tasting League, beer lovers will have the opportunity to delve into the world of sensory analysis with Asheville's favorite beverage. Analyzing the visual, aromatic, and flavor characteristics of four preselected and unknown beers, participants will be led through a discussion of different malt and hop profiles. Laughter and wild guesses are guaranteed as we attempt to identify the various styles of beer tasted in a fun exercise of the senses. 
 
Beer Blind Tastings are held at Metro Wines on Charlotte Street and begin at 6:00pm. Tickets for the Beer Blind Tasting League are $10 per person and can be purchased in advance at https://www.metrowinesasheville.com/store/product/blind-tasting-league-tickets-beer/. Reservations are requested. Parking is plentiful and free!
 
 
Continue reading
691 Hits

Kim Thompson: The Story of Becoming Something Else

Most of us are familiar with the main ingredients in beer: water, hops, yeast, and grain (usually barley).  Each one of these ingredients are fascinating and complex on their own if you really dig into them. Hops are incredibly hard to grow. Yeast are particularly complex and finicky single cell organisms. Water chemistry can make the difference between a good beer and a great beer for a number of reasons. And grains.  Grains are the ingredient that make me ask, “How did the ancient brewers ever figure this out?!”  One cannot simply go out to their barley field, thresh a bunch of grains, and start brewing.  The grains must first be malted in order to be useful to the brewer.  Soda shops and malted milk balls have put malt in our common vernacular. We all have heard this term before, but how many of us really understand what it means?  I certainly didn’t have a full understanding of the process myself before entering into this industry. I’ll save you the vocabulary words and the diagrams.  Simply put, the maltster (that’s someone who makes malt) tricks the grain into growing.  They give the seeds just enough air and water to make them start to grow, then they dry it out, and roast the grains to develop the flavor and color. This process allows the starches in the grains to break down into simpler sugars that can then be extracted by the brewer and fermented by the yeast. Skip the malting step, and all you have is seed water. Insert pouty face here.

Until just recently, the only people malting grains were behemoth companies that supplied behemoth breweries. Those companies still exist, but now we are seeing craft maltsters start to work with grains that are locally grown and supply local craft breweries and homebrewers. They are still few and far between, but we are fortunate to have Riverbend Malt House here in Asheville. What makes them exceptional is that they are working with North Carolina grown grains that other maltsters wouldn’t normally bother with. This is bolstering a post-tobacco farming community that has been weeded out of business and struggling to retool their farms to stay in business. 

The work of malting is arduous. There is a lot of shoveling grains onto the malting floor, then into the kiln, then on to final packaging – usually tons at a time. It isn’t often considered “women’s work”, but just like every other part of the brewing industry, there are always a few.  I spoke with Kim Thompson of Riverbend Malt about her role at the facility. “I’ll admit that I come from a spoiled perspective of women in this industry. Riverbend is not a dude-bro club. These guys are conscientious about what they are doing, and the way they treat their employees is amazing. Everyone I've come across has been generous and open. It seems to be a pretty laid back community of like-minded people who are all about shared passions and getting the job done. It may be just around the corner or perhaps I'm just reaping the benefits of the trailblazers that came before me. When I go to work, I know I’m going to work my ass off, laugh my ass off, and learn a hell of a lot, and that’s because of the guys that I work with. I can't take myself too seriously. I appreciate the differences, but so far, in everything I've chosen to do whether it's been unconventional or otherwise, being a woman has never been an advantage or a disadvantage for me. I follow my heart and my gut, I do it with drive and passion, and being a woman has never been an issue. I've actually never considered it or factored it into how I navigate life or chosen professions. ”

Because of the physical nature of the work, everyone at Riverbend moves around to different stations, so Kim is involved with each step of the process from raw grain to finished product. She says that she was prepared for the laborious nature of the job, but was floored (no pun intended) by the cerebral nature of it. “We’re working with a living organism,” she says. “Every day I go into the germination room, I smell the grains, feel them, and taste them to see where they are in the process. I’m a very tactile person, and this is my way of educating my senses. It gives me a deeper understanding and appreciation for the process.”

She points to her childhood and adolescence in Germany and Belgium as the roots for her two main passions: bread and beer.  She knew that she wanted to be a part of the industries that make them happen, and working with the raw materials has given her that outlet.  She also mills grain into flour for Carolina Ground, and artisanal stone mill in Asheville. “I like having a hand in the story that becomes something else. I enjoy doing things so that other people don’t have to them and knowing that what I do makes life easier for other people. Whether the consumer even thinks about malting barley or milling grain, it’s an important part of modern life. We all have no idea how many hands go into the thing that allows us to be in the world the way we are today.” She says she’s comfortable being the human equivalent to a blue screen: the thing that you can’t see, but it makes your experience richer.  “Take our Riverbend Heritage Malt, for example.  I malt that at Riverbend, then I grind it into flour at Carolina Ground.  Then The French Broad Chocolate Lounge uses that flour to make pastries.  The person that eats that cake isn’t thinking about the flour or the malted grains that it comes from. They’re simply enjoying dessert. I love having my hand in so many steps of the process that make that experience possible for people.”

I asked Kim if she has a favorite beer. “Well,” she said, “I tend to go through phases depending on seasons and what's available or being a total nerd and getting into pairing, but saisons or anything with funk are the styles that are most appealing to me.”  And her favorite grain to work with? “Rye is beautiful.  It’s so complex in flavor, and it has this rich mouthfeel. I want to mill some of our malted rye into flour and bake with it at home.”

So why didn’t Kim pursue a career in baking or brewing? “I like being a part of that process on my own at home, but just because you like to cook doesn’t mean you should be a chef. Besides, I like to do things that are [physically] hard to do. What we do isn’t easy, but that’s what makes it so beautiful.”

Continue reading
758 Hits

FRIDAY BEER TASTING - Jolly Pumpkin-Anchorage Brewing Calabaza Boreal Collaboration

This Friday between 5-7pm we'll be pouring this intriguing collaboration brew between Anchorage Brewing and Jolly Pumpkin in Dexter, MI. Calabaza Boreal is an ale brewed with grapefruit peel, juice and peppercorns and holds true to the wild, funky style that Jolly Pumpkin is known for. ENJOY!

From the brewer:

“He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you. -Nietzche

When introspection fails, it’s time to look outward for inspiration, perhaps Northward! One of the people who inspired me this past year is my friend Gabe Fletcher, of Anchorage Brewing Co. We brewed this beer together. I hope it inspires you. Northward!

Warm regards,
RON”

 

 

Continue reading
708 Hits